1. Jorinde and Joringel

This is the last (for now) of the illustrations I have created for my self initiated project that was inspired by fairy tales. I set out to create ten images (In the end I did eleven) as a way to improve my illustration skill. This image was done several months after the last image hence the difference in style. I’m currently enjoying a bolder, simpler style; this is the only image out of the 11 that was done in Illustrator (with the texturing in Photoshop). All the others were created entirely in Photoshop.

This particular illustration is for the Brothers Grimm tale of Jorinde and Joringel. It is the tale of a witch who lives in a secluded castle, and a couple of lovers. The lovers, despite warnings, stray too close to the witches castle. Joringel is frozen in place like a tree, unable to move or talk while the witch turns Jorinde into a Nightingale. Joringel become free once the witch is gone and flees to a nearby village. Pining for Jorinde, Joringel takes a job as a shepherd and one night has a vivid dream about a magical flower that can break the witches spells.

Read more on my blog

    Jorinde and Joringel

    This is the last (for now) of the illustrations I have created for my self initiated project that was inspired by fairy tales. I set out to create ten images (In the end I did eleven) as a way to improve my illustration skill. This image was done several months after the last image hence the difference in style. I’m currently enjoying a bolder, simpler style; this is the only image out of the 11 that was done in Illustrator (with the texturing in Photoshop). All the others were created entirely in Photoshop.

    This particular illustration is for the Brothers Grimm tale of Jorinde and Joringel. It is the tale of a witch who lives in a secluded castle, and a couple of lovers. The lovers, despite warnings, stray too close to the witches castle. Joringel is frozen in place like a tree, unable to move or talk while the witch turns Jorinde into a Nightingale. Joringel become free once the witch is gone and flees to a nearby village. Pining for Jorinde, Joringel takes a job as a shepherd and one night has a vivid dream about a magical flower that can break the witches spells.

    Read more on my blog

  2. The Old Women in the Woods

My tenth image in my self initiated fairy tale inspired series of illustrations. The Old Woman in the Woods by the Brothers Grimm.

The old woman in the woods is the tale of a beautiful but poor servant girl. After a brutal attack on the family she works for, she is left the sole surviver, alone in the woods. Lost, the girl is unable to find her way home. A dove comes to the rescue and brings her a series of golden keys to open trees that provides her with shelter and food each night.

Read more on my blog

    The Old Women in the Woods

    My tenth image in my self initiated fairy tale inspired series of illustrations. The Old Woman in the Woods by the Brothers Grimm.

    The old woman in the woods is the tale of a beautiful but poor servant girl. After a brutal attack on the family she works for, she is left the sole surviver, alone in the woods. Lost, the girl is unable to find her way home. A dove comes to the rescue and brings her a series of golden keys to open trees that provides her with shelter and food each night.

    Read more on my blog

  3. The Juniper Tree

My ninth fairy tale illustration. The story of The Juniper Tree, once again by the prolific duo that were the Brothers Grimm.

Read more on my blog

    The Juniper Tree

    My ninth fairy tale illustration. The story of The Juniper Tree, once again by the prolific duo that were the Brothers Grimm.

    Read more on my blog

  4. Hansel and Gretel

Eight illustration in my fairy tale series. This time the popular and well known tale of Hansel and Gretel that get left in the woods, find a candy house and get caught by a witch. Gretel saves the day and the witch gets roasted.

More on my blog

    Hansel and Gretel

    Eight illustration in my fairy tale series. This time the popular and well known tale of Hansel and Gretel that get left in the woods, find a candy house and get caught by a witch. Gretel saves the day and the witch gets roasted.

    More on my blog

  5. The House in the Woods

My seventh fairy tale illustration, this one for the tale of the interchangeably titled The House in the Woods or the Hut in the Forest, once again by the Grimm Brothers.

This is the tale of a woodcutter and his three daughters. The oldest is sent into the forest to forage dinner but doesn’t return. You can find out if her younger sisters kindness saves the day by reading more on my blog.

    The House in the Woods

    My seventh fairy tale illustration, this one for the tale of the interchangeably titled The House in the Woods or the Hut in the Forest, once again by the Grimm Brothers.

    This is the tale of a woodcutter and his three daughters. The oldest is sent into the forest to forage dinner but doesn’t return. You can find out if her younger sisters kindness saves the day by reading more on my blog.

  6. A little treat for all you Hayao Miyazaki / Studio Ghibli fans

  7. ziggy9911 asked: Just curious on how you approach composition and perspective. I feel as if sometimes I think too hard, not really about what to draw but how to draw it and make it look interesting. The comic panels you have been doing are amazing. Any tips/references on improving my knowledge of composition and perspective? What do you think about as you lay your pencil on the drawing paper? what goes through your mind?

    jakewyattriot:

    *STANDARD DISCLAIMER* I’m not handing down life lessons or trying to assert that there’s a ‘correct way’ to draw. I’m just trying to make perspective more approachable for thems that want to tackle it.

    Okay. Let’s do this.

    1. Understand what perspective is and what it’s for. Stay away from rulers while you get comfortable.

    Everyone struggles with perspective because 1. it’s not well or widely taught and 2. artists tend to see linear perspective as a set of rules rather than a set of tools.

    Linear perspective is a TOOL we use to create and depict SPACE. That’s it. That’s all it is. Your goal is not to draw in ‘accurate linear perspective.’ Stay away from the ruler and precision for as long as you can. Your goal is to create the illusion of three-dimensional space on a two-dimensional surface. Perspective is just a tool to help you construct and correct that space.

    2. Know in your bones that you can ONLY learn to draw in perspective through physical practice. There is no other way.

    Grab some paper and draw with me. If you match me drawing for drawing you will be more fluent in linear perspective and spatial drawing by the end of this post. Unfortunately if you don’t, you won’t be.

    3. Sketch around in rough perspective. NO RULERS.

    So let’s make some simple space. let’s start with a two dimensional surface…

    K. We have a flat, 2D surface. Let’s create some depth by putting a vanishing point in the middle, and having parallel lines converge towards it. Make a gridded plane inside that space.

    Good. Let’s make that space meaningful by adding a dude and a road or something. (Again, parallel ‘depth lines’ will converge into the vanishing point along the horizon)

    And now we have the rough illusion of some space. I didn’t use any rulers, and it’s not perfectly accurate, but we got our depth from that vanishing point right in the middle of the page. And since we have a little dude in there, we’ve got human scale, which allows us to gauge the size of the space we’ve created. Gives it meaning.

    You need people or cars or some recognizable, human-scale THING in there as a frame of reference or your space won’t mean much to your viewer. Watch. We can make that same basic space a whole lot bigger like this:

    Same vanishing point in the same place, completely different scale, and a totally different feeling of space. Cool, right?

    3. Sketch around in rough perspective MORE. STAY LOOSE.

    See what sort of spaces and feelings you can create with vanishing points and gridded planes on a post-it or something. Super small, super rough. Feel it out. Pick a vanishing point or lay out a grid in perspective, and MAKE SOME SPACE. Do it. Draw, I don’t know, a lady and her dog in a desert. I’ll do it, too.

    Good job. LOOK AT YOU creating the illusion of space! This is how you’ll thumbnail and plan anything you want to draw in space. All of my drawings start this way. I think about how I want the viewer to feel and then play around with space and composition until I find something that works.

    Once you have a sketch you like, and space that you feel, THEN you can take out the ruler and make it more accurate and convincing.

    4. Draw environments from life.

    I cannot stress this enough. Draw the world around you, try to draw the shapes and angles as you see them, and you will ‘get’ how and why perspective is used. Use something permanent so that you’ll move fast and commit. I usually use black prismacolor pencil.

    You’ll learn or reinforce something with every drawing. I learned a lot about multiple vanishing points from this drawing:

    Learned from the receding, winding space I tired to draw here:

    Layered, interior spaces:

    You get the idea.

    Life drawing will also help you develop your own shorthand and language for depicting textures, materials, details, natural and architectural features, etc. Do it. Do it all the time. Go to pretty or interesting places just to draw them.

    Take a second and just draw a quick sketch of whatever room you’re in.

    5. Perspective in formal Illustration: apply what you’ve learned.

    1. I always start with research. For this particular location I looked at Angkor Wat.

    2. Once I had enough reference, I did a bunch of little thumbnail sketches with a very loose sense of space and picked the one I liked best.

    3. Scanned the thumbnail and drew a little more clearly over it. Worked out the rough space before using formal perspective.

    4. Reinforced the space with formal perspective. I dropped in pre-made vanishing points over my drawing. If I were drawing in real media here’s where I’d get out the ruler to sketch in some accurate space.

    5. Drew the damn thing. Because I do my research, draw from life, and am comfortable drawing in perspective, I can wing it. I just sort of ‘build’ the ruins freehand in the space I’ve established, keeping it more or less accurate, experimenting and playing with details along the way. I erase a lot, too, both in PS and when drawing in pencil. Keeps it fun for me.

    And that’s what I know about composition and perspective. If you want more formal instruction on perspective and it’s uses, you can use John Buscema’s How to Draw Comics the Marvel Way. Or If you want to get really intense about it, Andrew Loomis can help you

    Excellent advice on drawing perspective from Jake Wyatt

  8. The Wedding of Mr Fox

My sixth fairy tale inspired Image. This one is of the Grimm Brothers’ less known tale, The Wedding of Mr Fox. A story of a fox with nine tails who decides to test the fidelity of his wife. He fakes his death and hides, waiting to see what happens. Many suiters come and try their luck but she rejects all until another nine tailed fox comes to town. They get married and Mr Fox comes out of hiding and drives them all away.

Nine tailed foxes originate in Asian mythology. You can read more on my blog

    The Wedding of Mr Fox

    My sixth fairy tale inspired Image. This one is of the Grimm Brothers’ less known tale, The Wedding of Mr Fox. A story of a fox with nine tails who decides to test the fidelity of his wife. He fakes his death and hides, waiting to see what happens. Many suiters come and try their luck but she rejects all until another nine tailed fox comes to town. They get married and Mr Fox comes out of hiding and drives them all away.

    Nine tailed foxes originate in Asian mythology. You can read more on my blog

  9. The Elves and the Shoemaker

The fifth illustration in my series of fairy tale illustrations.

I couldn’t resists the Christian Louboutin reference, oh and there is another subtle reference for Studio Ghibli fans in there, which shouldn’t be too hard to spot.

Read more on my blog

    The Elves and the Shoemaker

    The fifth illustration in my series of fairy tale illustrations.

    I couldn’t resists the Christian Louboutin reference, oh and there is another subtle reference for Studio Ghibli fans in there, which shouldn’t be too hard to spot.

    Read more on my blog

  10. hannahchristenson:

clavicola:

Hayao Miyazaki’s studio


Dat studio.

As a massive fan of Hayao Miyazaki’s work, this is fascinating to see

    hannahchristenson:

    clavicola:

    Hayao Miyazaki’s studio

    Dat studio.

    As a massive fan of Hayao Miyazaki’s work, this is fascinating to see

    (Source: commovente)